Testimonial: Sabel Rose of Sabel Rose Regalia Fine Art Quilts

A few months ago I woke up to the loveliest testimonial from Sabel Rose Regalia, a Californian fine art quilter! It is such a wonderful testimonial I am compelled to post her words verbatim!

Meeting and hiring Kelly Hogaboom @bespokehogaboom to coach me on my journey as a creative entrepreneur was like turning a corner while famished on a long, strenuous walk and coming upon a vibrant fruit tree abundant with ripe fruit, all within my reach. I arrived questioning if I would be able to make a true living from my art, (and still maintain loving my craft) and after I completed their course I came away confident that I could, with sacks of fruit and a map out of the woods.

🍊I chose to work with Kelly after following their wonderfully rich Instagram world and realizing how deeply they were rooted in a system of generosity, building community, and strong ethics.

🍋Enrolling in Kelly’s course was an engaging collaboration. Because success is a two way street, and it was clear how much Kelly respected me and truly believed in my ability to thrive, I made sure to show up with my best foot forward so we could walk together. I also loved meeting and working alongside the other students in the course, whose strong camaraderie further bolstered my experience.

🍏Receiving an abundance of knowledge is empowering, but it is also hard work, so as Kelly kept handing me bushels of ripe fruit, I focused hard to utilize their gifts of lesson plans and spreadsheet templates so they would not go to waste. I peeled, chopped, stewed, and canned their advice and teachings until I had a completed business plan, a solid cash forecast, a streamlined commissions process, and a heartfelt customer care model. Their guidance, encouragement and feedback at every step kept me going each week.

🫐Kelly has a gift for seeing the unique aspects of one’s industry and circumstances, and integrating it in such way so that advice is customized to something tangible and specific. Kelly also sets the example of someone creating, setting, maintaining and refining healthy boundaries, and this has actually benefited all aspects of my life.

🍇 Before meeting Kelly Hogaboom I had grown accustomed to living with underlying beliefs like I’ll always fall behind, I’m not good at technology, people won’t pay what I’m worth, and that I’m destined to always feel disorganized. I admit that those thoughts still sneak in sometimes, but when they do, I can now turn to the vast pantry of preserves I canned from all of Kelly’s advice, and I can relax and feast. My custom quilt business is thriving and I highly recommend you take them up on their offerings.

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Sabel was kind enough to come on IG live with me last week, and talk about how her business is going since we last worked together in the Fall:

Listen to her tell you all about it – in her own words!

Play Video about Sabel Rose Regalia of Sabel Rose Fine Art Quilts, praising the WHOLE ENCHILADA from Bespoke Hogaboom

Kelly
Hey Instagram, it’s Kelly with Bespoke Hogaboom. I’m going Live with my friend and extremely skilled quilt maker – and one of my students from the WHOLE ENCHILADA, which is my business course for ethical Creatives. We are running two eleven-week courses this year in 2022. So hopefully Sabel will come join us pretty quick. Sabel is a quilt artist – there she is. Let me bring her on. Hello … Oh, there you are. Hello!

Sabel
I’m here. Can you hear me?

Kelly
Yeah, but I just realized I probably should plug my headphones into my phone. Yeah, so thank you for joining me Sabel, I know you’re super busy. It’s been awesome watching you on your Instagram and getting the occasional email. So just because I know some of your followers should be here and they know you pretty well. But do you mind introducing yourself to anyone who hasn’t met you yet and saying what your business is?

Sabel
Yeah, my name is Sabel. Sabel Rose Regalia. And I am a quilter primarily. I do all kinds of art. But the last few years it’s been quilts. And I have a big huge quilt studio that I’m in right now. It’s nice and long. There’s a big giant machine down there. And I’m in my little sewing side of it right here. I live in Northern California in Santa Rosa. I make quilts for people all over the world!

Kelly
Awesome. And – so I was trying to remember how we met. Do you – do you remember? How we found each other?

Sabel
Yes, it was here on Instagram, my good friend Joshua, who has a business and art business called Big Mouth Unique. And –

Kelly
Okay!

Sabel
He – I’m not sure where he found you. Someone pointed you out to him on his Instagram. And one day him and I – we’re always chatting. He’s a good friend. He’s here in Santa Rosa. And we’re both doing similar things of just making art and trying to live a Creative life. And we are always, you know, supporting each other with little ideas. And one day, he said, “Hey, check out this person’s Instagram. I’m seeing a lot of good videos that might just help get you on your way!” And then when you were offering a course – I think I took a Pricing course of yours?

Kelly
Yeah!

Sabel
I joined it like really last minute, like I’d been seeing you post about it. And then all of a sudden, it was like – it starts in two hours! And I was like, “Alright I’m in!” And then I was like, I think I want to take Kelly’s full, WHOLE ENCHILADA. And then Joshua gave me a few hundred dollars to put towards it, which was so sweet –

Kelly
Aw!

Sabel
It was out of the blue. And he was like, I’m doing good. And I just want to support you. And I don’t feel like taking the course. But here you go. And so that was just a really sweet thing. And so one day, I hope to be able to pass that along to somebody. Because I thought that was just a really nice supportive thing that he did!

Kelly
Yeah, that’s amazing! Actually there are two students who took the course who want to give a scholarship forward, which I probably need to arrange that pretty soon. That’s a really cool gift. I didn’t know that.

Kelly
So how did you get involved in quilting? I’ve never actually asked you this.

Sabel
Yeah! My family kind of did it. My grandmother always made quilts for everybody – like a new quilt for every kid that was born. And I think there are thirteen of us cousins. And anytime someone got married, she would bust something out. And it was it was always very revered, you know I remember like, every time it was like, “Oh, another quilt she’s got the quilt ready and finished and she’s gonna give it to the baby!” And it was always like a big deal at that family gathering and everybody would gather around and ooh and ahh and want to touch it and exclaim about how cool it was. And so I learned that that was a revered thing. That it was like, “Oh, that’s a neat way to make art!” And, and then as I got older, we would do friendship quilts for the family. Like somebody would be getting married so everybody in the family would do a square. So I had to figure out how to how to do it. And my mom had showed me how to use a sewing machine. But I wasn’t like really gung-ho – I’m still not a garment maker. I’m terrified of patterns in – colors and things like that. I’m like, “Oh, God all my art is flat!” But I learned how to do some quilt squares and then somebody in the family would sew them all together. So I did that a few times. And then one day, I was just messing around and accidentally made a quilt. I kept sewing things together and was like, “Oh, this is just like paper collage, but with fabric” and then I just kind of did it a little bit over the years. And then a few years ago, a couple people asked “Oh, can you make me a quilt and how much would that be?” And I’m like, “I don’t know – like $200?” I had no idea what I was doing – but I’ve just been building and building and building and now here I am.

Kelly
That’s that’s an amazing story about the family respect for the craft because that was true in my family as well. It wasn’t quite like everyone would gather around. But there was a high amount of respect for for the art of sewing.

Sabel
Yeah.

Kelly
And so I started as an engineer, chemical engineer. If you would have told me twenty years ago that this would be my space and this is what I was doing, I’d say “No way!” But I always had that respect. Even before I had the skills – *long* before I had the skills –

Sabel
Yeah!

Kelly
So that’s pretty interesting –

Sabel
Well, I’ve always been interested in biology and science, and I never finished graduating from any college, but I’ve taken hundreds of units in mostly science. I’ve done all the math and all the science and chemistry and biology and studied herbalism for a lot of years and worked as an herbalist for many years. And I was always in that path of nature and biology and science. And just I don’t know, here I am. Yeah, like I just like, there’s I’m interested in so many things – but this is what I’m doing right now. And even on I have moments of thinking, “I’m frustrated, and this isn’t working, and maybe I’ll stop” – that really just doesn’t even feel like an option. I’m like, Yeah, this is this is what I’m doing.

Kelly
So I’m gonna probably dive right into the nitty gritty. Because this is kind of a fraught topic, really. I just recorded a podcast yesterday, and the person I was recording with makes a lot of dresses, and she talked about [how] if you’re in the supermarket, and someone sees your dress and says “That’s amazing!” And you say, “Oh, I made it!” And then they say, “Oh, well, could you make me one? How much would that be?” And if you tell them a number that is even close to a fair wage, then all of a sudden, they’re gonna say, “Oh – I can’t afford that!” And so it goes from like a compliment, people just: “Oh, my gosh!’ and then it goes – it can go really quickly to – actually an insult. So how do you feel about that? How do you bridge that gap? We’re scared to –

Sabel
Well, I personally haven’t felt much of the insult part. I think when I tell people a number that’s higher than they expected, I will get a shock – I’ll see the shock. And I’ll see the them kind of go, “Wow, I can’t do that. That’s too expensive!” But most of the time, they say “- but I see it’s really worth it!” and “I see you work really hard at it and that’s just out of my budget.” And I see that. I luckily haven’t gotten much of the insults like – “How could you do that?” And I don’t know, maybe I will one day.

Kelly
Well, part of that is how we devalue garment workers in our culture. We all expect to get a t-shirt for five bucks. And a pair of jeans for a hundred bucks and – stuff like that.

Sabel
Yeah. And I think I might – my natural mode is to get kind of defensive when I feel anything. So I’ll tend to jump into explaining how much materials it takes and how much time it takes. So I like – I kind of front load with like, “I know it’s expensive, but it’s five hundred dollars just in the fabric and thirty to a hundred hours!” And so people will – I’ll give them that info pretty quickly. And now I try to just have that info on my website, so that I’m like – if you’re messaging me wanting something, you’ve probably already read something on my website, because that’s how you got into my emails, or that’s – and these are things you’ve taught me.

Kelly
I was about to say –

Sabel
Yeah!

Kelly
I remember you said you got just so much from that Pricing course, which was about an hour, hour and a half.

Sabel
Yeah!

Kelly
And one of the things I recommend is to have your prices front and center or a range of prices, because for [instance] me, I’m all custom so there’s kind of a range, right? – So that I know has changed your – like you say by the time someone contacts you, they’re probably acclimated a bit.

Sabel
That’s what I’m hoping! That’s what makes me feel relaxed – is what I’ve noticed. And by the time someone is actually booking a consultation or reaching out with any sense of seriousness, that they have hopefully already at least read somewhere a range of my prices, so they understand that my quilts are in the thousands of dollars and not in the hundreds of dollars. Because it’s really – it is very hard to not want to acquiesce –

Kelly
Oh gosh!

Sabel
and like, “Well I know this friend doesn’t make that much money and I really love them and I would love for them to have’+ but I’ve done that a bunch of times and given things away for free, stressed out and –

Kelly
Mh-hmm.

Sabel
and like you [Kelly] you’re a very generous person, that’s a big part of your business plan and, and mine as well. I *want* to be able to give things away. I mean, all my friends have babies, I want to be able to give away some baby blankets here and there. And I can do that more when I feel financially nourished by the commissions.

Kelly
That’s just really well said. Because when I went through my first business course in 2019 I was like “but I need to give it away!” I don’t know why I thought that – “people deserve this!” And my first coach said – well, she was my second coach – she said, “Make sure you’re taken care of first with whatever your income needs are and then give forward.” And that is a really smart way to set up a business.

Sabel
Yeah, exactly. Like if I can’t take care of myself, then I can’t do this.

Kelly
Yeah. So do you hobnob with other quilters ever? And by the way, anyone watching feel free to pop a question! This is a great time to ask questions of either of us. We love questions.

Sabel
I can’t wave on my end, because I joined your video I think!

Kelly
I’ve been waving at everybody!

Sabel
Well, great!

Kelly
But, um – do you hang out with other quilters?

Sabel
Do I hobnob with other quilters? Very few. And there are folks that have either already been friends before – we all were quilting or … a little tiny bit. And I follow a lot of quilters on Instagram. And a lot of them follow me. There is a community. But I shy away from it a little bit. It kind of stresses me out. I don’t align myself with the quilting world. I feel like I’m more aligned myself with – painters, someone that’s making a fine painting. A lot of the quilters are doing something a little different than me. They’re making patterns, and they’re selling their patterns. And then they’re designing fabric and then getting contracts with fabric companies and that kind of thing. And they’re creating samples of patterns and showing those quilts. I do my own stuff. I don’t do other people’s patterns for the most part – every once in a while I do. And people will ask me for a pattern of one of my quilts. And I’m like, No, that’s my quilt. Like: you could look at it, you can kind of figure it out –

Kelly
*You* could figure it out.

Sabel
Yeah –

Kelly
And a pretty proficient quilter could, but –

Sabel
So I just – I haven’t because I find that that’s where I get most of the borderline insulting kind of conversations that throw me off. Other quilters that maybe wish they could sell their quilts, but they haven’t quite begun the years of work I’ve done to get to where I am confidently pricing my quilts in the thousands of dollars range. And I’m fielding a lot of their harsh reactions to that. And I’m like – this isn’t where I want to be.

Kelly
That’s why I asked that question –

Sabel
Yeah!

Kelly
Because hobbyists can, instead of approaching you with curiosity, or saying, “Sabel can I pay for an hour of your time? Can I ask you some questions?” –

Sabel
Yeah!

Kelly
Hobbyists can be very – they can be kind of crummy. And I think that some of them, it’s not necessarily that they want to go into business, but they want to feel *valued*. And when they see that you’re valued by your followers *and* you’re getting paid, it can trigger those like, kind of nasty – or they’ll make assumptions: that you sort of waltzed into this, as opposed to, like you said – it’s hard work to run a business.

Sabel
Uh-huh.

Kelly
It’s hard work. Because when I met you, you were still a little uncomfy with pricing. And now that problem has been removed for you.

Sabel
Yeah, I need to do another pass over with it. That’s something I’m going to do –

Kelly
Nice!

Sabel
Like everything that I did in your course with doing the spreadsheets and the cash flow, the Cash Forecast and the pricing: really doing a good solid cost analysis? I did that in your course. And now almost a year later, I’m ready to do another pass over with all of it. Because now that I’ve actually done this a bunch, and I’ve done more king sized quilts I had – I don’t know if I’d even done one full-on King size quilt when I started your course. And now I’ve done a few and they just take *so much longer* – it’s unbelievable the exponential amount from a queen to a king. It’s like I think “Oh, just a few more inches” and it’s not it’s like –

Kelly
Yeah!

Sabel
*Tens* of hours more just because I’m wrestling this huge beast. So anyways, yeah, I’m about to do another pass over and definitely raise my prices because that’s what everyone’s been doing this year with the inflation. And I’d like to pretend like that doesn’t exist and it’s not my world but it does.

Kelly
Yeah.

Sabel
It does, so!

Kelly
I just made a king-size weighted blanket so – much simpler than a quilt but of course very heavy it gets heavier every step you take! But – and I’ve made a few king-size quilts, not quite at your level, of course – it is a lot of work and a lot of muscle by the end. Yeah!

Kelly
We have an awesome question.

Sabel
Yeah, that’s a good question.

Kelly
Go ahead.

Sabel
“Have you seen a difference in number of inquiries since posting your rates?” I have! And also that simultaneously happened with – I posted my rates as I was bolstering my business, as I was setting up a newsletter getting out emails to people and then setting up all sorts of things and pushing it a little bit more on social media. So maybe the number of inquiries hasn’t changed. But the people that are inquiring are more serious when someone inquires, and then I respond [and] I don’t get ghosted. And that was something that was happening. And that was something [Kelly] taught me – you use that as an example of like, someone would see me out of the blue on Instagram, someone I didn’t know a friend of a friend, [and they’d say] “Wow, I’m totally enchanted by your work. I would love to know – what are your prices?” and then I would write a thoughtful paragraph to them – like, a nice solid paragraph. And then I’d never hear back because it was like, you know, sticker shock, or whatever. So all right, so *now* when someone writes, they’ve probably been to my website. And they’ve probably seen some type of amount. And so their inquiry is a lot more serious.

Kelly
– and respectful too because, even if I choose not to partner with you, – like maybe I haven’t seen your website, and I ask you and ou send me an email and you either type the paragraph or you refer me to your site – whatever you do, It’s not respectful for me not to respond. And I think that when the price is already out there and the infrastructure’s out there you’re more likely to get a respectful interaction. And I don’t know about you, but that’s that makes a big difference in my life to – just be respected. Right?

Sabel
Yeah. Oh, yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. Because that’s – that’s what goes both ways. And I was re-reading my client avatar here that I’ve got –

Kelly
Oh, nice!

Sabel
– that we did in your course. And re-reading it this week. I was like, okay, I had a pretty frustrating week, because I made a major mistake on a quilt. I wasn’t even sure if I was gonna bring it up here. But I switched the dimensions length and width when I was making this quilt. Because a king size quilt is the only bed quilt that’s wider than it is long. And so when I was looking at the number that the client desired, I made it long – hotdog instead of hamburger, whatever –

Kelly
Gotcha!

Sabel
– and I completed it, it was done. Every detail was done. And I threw it on my boyfriend’s bed because he has a king-sized bed to take a picture and was like – “Oh! Uh-oh! Oh no! And, yeah I had a little heart attack. And then – okay, I have two options. I can either call the client and be like: “Silly mistake, oh, well, here’s your quilt. It’ll just be sideways, the design will be oriented different!” And it’s a duvet so the little envelope opening would be on the side. And after a day, I was like, “That’s ridiculous. I have to take this apart and fix this.” And so that’s what I did. That’s what I spent many hours this week [doing]: fixing a mistake. And I forgot – I brought that up because –

Kelly
You were talking about revisiting the avatar. And by the way – that’s a great story and I want to circle back to that. But go ahead.

Sabel
Yeah, because that was something that you taught [us]: the customer care model. That is what is most important. And this client might have been really nice and been like, “Oh, it’s sideways. That’s okay. Don’t worry about it, just send it to me!” But I don’t want to put them in that position to have to be nice to me, when I said I would do something to these specifications and I made a mistake. And I don’t want to put them in this position of having to take care of me when I’m the one that did it. And so I wanted to make sure. I haven’t told her that I made that mistake. But I’m mailing – I just dropped it off in the post office. And she’s really excited, and she’s seen photos. I might tell her if we talk on the phone, or maybe she’ll watch this!

Sabel
So I – the client avatar is where I was going [with this] because this is the place where we – for folks that don’t know, it was an exercise that Kelly had us do in their course where we answered questions about our ideal client and really visualized all the traits within that person. And then we answered those same questions about ourselves – what really makes us tick. Then you look at the answers to both of those yourself and your ideal client. And they really were very similar. So it was all about kind of getting into your bones how much respect is so paramount in this. And me respecting my client enough to fix this mistake and take it on myself. Rather than just kind of go, “Oh, well, whatever. It’s fine. Close enough!”

Kelly
Och, yeah! So I should tell you, my little Instagram timer is going to kick me out in a minute, but I’ll come right back. And if I disappear – it’ll probably be in about four minutes.

Kelly
I love that story Sabel. Obviously, I’ve had many of those experiences: where I finished something and I realized there’s an error. And it’s not quite an error – I need that moment of saying thing, “Do I fix it? Do I redo it?” – I mean, I’ve re-done things entirely from scratch! Do I give it and then give them a discount? Do I give it to them and wait to see if *they* say something? Because sometimes it’s an issue that is just so subtle that you kind of are like – well, they’re a grownup, let’s see if they say something. So those are kind of your – and then the third option, the last option would be just… some some people that don’t price very well and have bad clientele. They get a resentful attitude toward their clients. And so they’re like, “This was so much work, and you paid for it and you’re just gonna suck it up!” So it’s such a great story to hear, although I totally hear you on lthat moment where it’s like, oh, my gosh, this is hours of correction.

Sabel
Yeah. And I had already spent more hours and more money on this project than I expected. And [I] already [had] this feeling like “Oh, this I priced a little low!” I already was feeling that and – it’s an interesting place. I’ve been in the last few months watching the creative flow of like, if money didn’t exist, and I was just here to make quilts as they come into my body. And I really want to come out – and then line it up with paying your bills on the days you’re supposed to pay your bills! This like, stiff thing that we’ve created. This culture versus the true flowing Creative, ethereal thing – putting those together is gonna be a lifelong learning experience. I’m doing much better. I look at where I was a year ago, and I’ve got so many systems down.

Sabel
I’m actually feeling pretty damn confident about QuickBooks. That was a little scary.

Kelly
Nice! Yeah!

Sabel
That was a little scary. But I’ve got a great bookkeeper that helped set me up. And she’s been teaching me how to do the complicated merchant fee deductions and all these little goofy things, but I’m feeling much better about that. I still need to do another pass over with my pricing, raise my prices a bit figuring out how much time I spend on things. I know there was a time I remember you saying that you just know what you offer pretty well. If someone says “I want a jumpsuit” you know pretty well how many hours that’s gonna take you. I keep shocking myself with how long things take. And I’m like, “Oh, I thought I could do that in twenty hours. We’re looking at thirty or forty.”

Kelly
Right!

Sabel
So yeah – still learning?

Kelly
You’ve got some kind of clicking I think – I don’t think it’s me. I don’t know if it’s your earring, your fabulous earrings, or –

Sabel
It is. It’s [my] earrings hitting [the headphones]? Yeah –

Kelly
I think – I wore big ones too. Yeah, I hope –

Sabel
These are beads clicking. Thanks for saying something!

Kelly
It sounded kind of like spider tapping.

Sabel
[laughs]

Kelly
So first of all, I just want to give you major props, because you just said that you have jumped into QuickBooks. I love QuickBooks. It’s expensive and all that but it’s pretty cool. I love my QuickBooks. But I also remember that in our time together besides starting the email newsletter – which is the thing I help people get going, and which personally I think is strongest marketing tool we have – but, you also refurbished your website, and you got a really great photographer.

Sabel
Yeah.

Kelly
And you have a professional logo. So if you want to speak to any of those things – I want to give you props for how well you did with those.

Sabel
Yeah, that was really fun. My logo – my good friend who’s a professional designer Julie Ott, O-T-T, you can find her on the internet. I’m not sure exactly what she’s doing these days. But she designed my logo for me. She gave me a pretty good deal, probably better of a deal than she needed to but I got a beautiful logo. And then I got a photography session, a personal branding photography session from a local woman named Tenaya from Dream Speak Design here in Sonoma County. And that was amazing – I saw her somehow somewhere on the internet through local friends. And I was like – what does she do? I went to her website and the information was just spelled out so perfectly. It was like: here’s how you book a consult –

Sabel
A mind-blowing example of how I wanted to run my business, and then I booked the consultation, and I got the email and the reminder and the this and that and everything just flowed. And then when we talked and then booked the session, I think I said to her when she was here: “You do everything the way I want to do it.” And she took that as a very sweet compliment. And then she passed on her project management software that she used called 17 Hats, 17hats.com. And that integrates with QuickBooks. And that’s been a great way to manage each project. because you can send your quotes and invoices through that and it keeps it all a little bit prettier than QuickBooks. So she did the beautiful branding photoshoot for me and gave me like three hundred and fifty photos that were all just gorgeous. And we talked – the way she did it was we had like an hour long phone call, where she asked me what are three stories I wanted to tell with these photos for my business. So we kind of divided it into kind of like my inspiration and how I get myself into my little creative zone. And – and then I forget what the other ones were. But we got great photos of the studio, of the space, of all my weird little dolls, of me doing some art, of me standing there looking pretty… photos of displays. So she’s like, here’s just pretty pieces of fabric you can use as background banners – because she’s a website designer too, so she knew what a someone in a small business would want.

Kelly
Nice.

Sabel
Yeah. So that was cool. And then what was the other one?

Kelly
You’ve done your website, your photographer, your logo –

Sabel
Yeah!

Kelly
– the other thing I mentioned.

Sabel
Yeah, the logo. So that was Julie. And that’s just fun to have. I can use it everywhere on everything. I’ve made stickers and cards and I’ve painted it. Can you see it right behind my head right there? I made a fabric logo of it right there. It was just fun to use everywhere.

Kelly
It’s a it’s a great logo. When I first saw it – because he already he already had it when we met –

Sabel
Yeah!

Kelly
I could tell that professional designed it. Definitely.

Sabel
[There’s] the little sticker right there.

Sabel
There you go.

Sabel
There’s that with – and then she has it with my name too – the big name.

Kelly
I love that it includes the – I can’t remember the name of the block. But it’s where there’s a circle all the way through the block –

Sabel
Yeah?

Kelly
What is that is that called –

Sabel
The circle that goes through the? Oh –

Kelly
Yeah, it’s not called a quarter circle –

Sabel
That’s what it’s called. A quarter circle!

Kelly
I definitely associate your work with that block because you use it so beautifully in so many different cool ways.

Kelly
So when we talk about a good-looking website, QuickBooks, a professional logo, a business course – that’s an awful lot of capital to outlay. And so what would you say to someone who says, “I know those things are valuable. I know I need them. I have limited funds – can I still start a business?” What would you tell that person?

Sabel
Yes. I mean you can do anything. You just might have to focus on taking photos with your phone and finding more apps to edit. That’s what I was doing. Before I got the pros to help. I had someone that was in a graphic design class a few years ago, [and she] made me a little logo in a couple of days for free. That was a friend’s roommate. And she was like, “Oh, I know a girl that’s in a class. And she’d be happy to help!” And she did a little thing for free. It was kind of these cute little leafy things with my name. And it was a little like – it worked. And I made cards because I needed something quickly because I was doing my first show. So she did that. And that was that was free. And she was in a class and it was like, “Okay, that worked! I’ve been using my smartphone for everything else. And it just takes a bit more time. So I mean, yeah, it’s like everything that we’re doing just to scrape by. I have built my own website with Squarespace. And maybe I would have done another company – but I’d already had it and I didn’t know better. And I think other other artists have [suggested] Wix or other ones – it’ll be easier. And I’ve done my own website, I’ve done like a couple passes over that. And I like it right now. But I still every time I look at somebody else’s website that I really like, I [think] “I want to do it like theirs!” and I want to change a few things. I do that periodically. I wouldn’t mind paying somebody else to do it. You know, it seems like three or four thousand seems to be a rate that I see for folks to do that. But I just haven’t had that money earmarked for that right now. What I have is working.

Kelly
Yeah! So you kind of – and that’s how I built my business too. I did the best I could just what I had. I used to hand-type and invoice and format it in – I think Pages [laugh] – and it wasn’t even an invoice someone could click and pay, right –

Sabel
Yeah!

Kelly
So we do whatever we have to do. Websites are kind of – I had a gal, as you know, I build websites – just about six a year for clients, right?

Sabel
Mm-hm!

Kelly
And I had a gal that was interested and I broke my own rule. And I put her on my calendar instead of making her look at my rates – and all of those things. And I met with her as a favor. Shouldn’t have done it. She had all these examples of sites that she liked. And they were like ten thousand, fifteen thousand dollar sites that she was just like, “I love this. I love that!” And then I said, “Okay, so what’s your budget?” She said, “Oh, eight hundred, nine hundred dollars” –

Sabel
[laughs]

Kelly
So, you know, that didn’t work out. But websites, you either gotta put a lot of time in or you better pay someone who knows what they’re doing. And that’s it. Those are your choices. Right?

Sabel
Mm-hm!

Kelly
But you know, there are a lot of editors that are pretty drag-and-drop, right? Yeah, they’re pretty usable in my opinion.

Sabel
Yeah. Just to keep it so that all the fonts are the same everywhere, and the colors kind of match up? Exactly.

Kelly
So yeah, and those are pretty inexpensive. But they take your time, right. And I guess we’ve kind of covered most – we haven’t talked about your Instagram or your email. But we do have that question [from a viewer]: “What’s the strongest part of your marketing strategy? And where do you need to grow?” It’s a great question.

Sabel
That is a great question. I think I am pretty darn good at social media and staying in touch with people. I have a newsletter with my emails, and I have not as regular with that as I would like to be. I seem to send an email every three to four weeks, instead of every week. I knew [that] wasn’t going to happen – a week just flies by like that.

Kelly
Mm-hm.

Sabel
So for me, like every two to three weeks seems good. And I see I get really sweet responses have a pretty high open rate – maybe about sixty-five percent. And I get folks to reply to me, which feels good. And then people will message me out of the blue, they’ll either text me or they’ll go and message me on Instagram to tell me how much they liked the newsletter email that they got. I get really good feedback from friends saying, “We really like what you’re doing.” It’s really clear people really appreciate understanding my commission process, which is like: join the newsletter, I’ll send links when – doing basically what you [Kelly] do. When I have an opening, I’ll send out links, and then you can pay a deposit and get a consultation. And I’m doing that seasonally. So I’m opening up my books and filling up four or five spots every season. I’m kind of hoping that’s the flow. I think that’s what’s going to work for me. We’ll see. So as far as the marketing goes, there’s – the Commission list is filling. I would like to do better marketing to sell my readymade pieces. Because I’ve got, you know, a pretty good stack of quilts. Now things I’ve just made in between commissions – when I need a little brain break I’ll bust out a baby quilt.There’s one right here on the wall, I’m about to quilt that one. I’d like to be able to sell those. I think if I could sell my already-made pieces that would put me in a really comfortable place financially right now. I feel like my commissions are keeping me like just breaking even. I’m doing it, but I’m not doing it fast enough. Because I’m realizing my commissions take longer than I think. I thought I could fit more in. I think I’ll be able to be more efficient as this year progresses. But I had a little bit of a slow start:”Oh my God, this isn’t sustainable!” But now I’m realizing it could be I just gotta tweak some things. And yeah, if I could just sell some of the one-off things I would like to do that. So I’m not sure if that’s making a little shop that’s really specific for baby quilts that I could market in places and put them in front of people – moms and grandmas and I don’t know, something like that.

Kelly
Yeah! I obviously get the same problem because as a Creative, we end up with inventory, we just do! Because we we have a commission, but then we do something for fun. We can’t – we cannot help ourselves. And it piles up really quick. Like I have an attic with three racks of clothing. Some of it is retail clothes that I bought and my kids grew out of, but a lot of it is stuff I’ve made and I’m gonna have a Chaos Sale this summer. And – I’ll probably make a little chunk of change, but it’s just gonna be garage sale style. Because building a shop and taking all those luscious photos – you’re really good at photos where you stack all the quilts and all that. Even when you build the shop, you’ve still got sort of a different clientele because once people think you’re custom, they kind of just think of you as custom.

Sabel
Yeah!

Kelly
So it can be really tricky.

Sabel
Yeah. And folks that want to drop – that can just like kind of impulse-buy a fifteen hundred dollar quilt from my website. I don’t think my – I don’t think I’m quite in front of those people yet. I have a lot of friends that are – they’re not wealthy people. They’re kind of blue collar – like our type of people, but they still want my quilts and they save up for it. And that’s – like you, I see that a lot, too. So they’re not necessarily folks that are just like, “Sure I can drop two thousand dollars in the middle of the night, because I’m feeling excited about that quilt on your website!” But I know those folks are out there.

Kelly
You’re right! They are.

Sabel
Yeah, they’re there. And also, I have smaller pieces, you know, three hundred and fifty, four hundred dollar baby blankets, that can be wall hangings. That can just be a painting on a wall as well. So yeah, that’s kind of the next layer of putting energy in.

Kelly
Marketing takes way more time and effort than people realize. Because people think, “Oh, Instagram is free so I can just chuck something up on Instagram.” It’s like, that’s right – but who’s going to see it? I mean, not even our own followers see our stuff anymore, right? So if you’re trying to reach a new market –

Sabel
Yeah.

Kelly
It takes time, effort – or it takes hiring someone, right? Yeah, to do that for you. So it’s a little –

Sabel
And I’m open to doing that. But I also don’t know who exactly to hire. I’m seeing ads – as soon as I clicked on one thing, now I’m seeing all these ads for ways to help build your business. And I’m like, Well, which on of you are really gonna –

Kelly
Right?

Sabel
So I don’t know if this is quite what I want to do. So I’m just sitting back and trying to just do my little pieces. I will tell you, I have spent a total of now eleven hours with tech support with Meta, which is the Facebook-Instagram thing now, just trying to integrate my Instagram shop with my Dacebook page shop with my actual website through Squarespace because now they offer that. And it is buggy, and it is not working. And right now my Instagram and my Facebook are not connected. I’ve been on the phone and emailing with people. Like I said eleven hours of my life in the last couple of weeks. And I’ve kind of given up and haven’t done it this week. But I thought it would be an easy way where I upload items to my website and then it just magically integrates into my Instagram and my Facebook shop. And there everybody has access! And it’s just not working. I’m pretty annoyed, like –

Kelly
Yeah!

Sabel
So I’m trying to not be too mad. I’m just like, “Okay, great, then that’s not where I’m putting my energy right now.” And I’m going to do a couple of live events this year. There’s an art festival in the park across the street from my house that I got into, in a couple of weeks. So that’ll be cool. And I don’t know, I guess I’m – every day is just little steps. I’m just trying to take little steps towards something every day, whether it’s working on new designs for a few minutes every day, and a little bit of marketing and putting -working on some commissions and messing around with QuickBooks. I’m just trying to like keep it all just moving forward at the very least.

Kelly
It’s a lot of work, and no one else will do it for us. So you know I know the exact drill. So we’ve talked about – you’ve kind of mentioned some of the things you you learned. I love the Customer Avatar, Customer Care, Pricing, Costing properly. So for the [WHOLE ENCHILADA] course, how did you feel about the peer interaction? Because to me that’s one of the best things about the course. And it’s hard to convey how valuable it is.

Sabel
Yeah, I really liked that a lot. You had it set up where we had a Study Buddy session with a different person in the class every week. That was fun. I mean, I don’t know how much like actual studying I did with that person during the hours. [We were] mostly just chit-chatting, which was great, which was really great! A couple of times we sat there and actually went through the questions but a lot of it was just getting to know each other and having the camaraderie of other people doing what you’re doing but slightly different. Because we were all doing something – some slightly different type of art. And most of us were doing art. That was great. I really liked that. And I feel like I’m friends with a bunch of people in the next [cohort] because a lot of them follow methrough you or or through your Discord server which I’m not active on because – I want to be with it’s hard to add another app to touch. But there are folks of yours that have followed me and vice versa and we support each other and it’s really sweet. I just bought a tie dye dress from Nancy I think?

Kelly
Oh yeah, yeah!

Sabel
And everyone that’s in this group I’m seeing and – Virginia, who you’re going to Live with next week – just adorable. And so yeah – you have a real knack for creating community and helping hold that infrastructure of it – of other artists. And that’s really special and really fun. And I really appreciate that.

Kelly
And I appreciate you introducing me to Hudson because –

Sabel
Oh! Yeah!

Kelly
You know, he was so great in our cohort and I think he was the only man in the cohort. But also he was doing something really different. And it was just a delight to have him there. Of course, yeah – an amazing person.

Sabel
Yeah. And he’s thriving in it. I think he’s listening right now. And him and I tried to check in every other week or so specifically about business stuff and just chit-chat –

Kelly
Perfect!

Sabel
He encouraged me to write down on my wall, I have it written right there: “I sell my king size quilts for eight thousand dollars each!”

Kelly
Yeah!

Sabel
He’s really encouraging me to like, step up my pricing. And, you know, I was like, “God, like eight thousand dollars would be amazing!” And right now I’m priced at thirty-five hundred. And I need to raise it probably at least a thousand dollars right now. And he was like, “Well, what about eight thousand?” I’m like, “Oh it’s so scary!” But the more I have it up on the wall, the more I’m like, “Okay, let me get to this -“

Kelly
Yeah!

Sabel
Let me get used to looking at that number. Is that okay, am I allowed to? And yeah, so him and I chat about that kind of thing. And he’s really encouraging.

Kelly
That’s wonderful.I love to hear that. Yeah. Um, I feel like I had a specific question for you. And now I’m kind of not remembering what it was. I’m glad you’ve got that pricing confidence. And I will say – oh, this is my question! One thing we hear all the time, it’s very popular in memes, very popular articles that get recycled every year is that “if you monetize your hobby, you will come to hate it.” What do you think about that?

Sabel
I don’t know. I don’t subscribe to that. Like I said this week, when I had that hard week of making that major mistake on that quilt and I had some moments of like, “I ‘have to’ sit here and do this,” – I had a couple of moments of like, “I think I hate quilting!” And “I don’t think I’m gonna do that!” And I laughed, the minute I had the thought, because I was like: just fix your mistake and move on with this. You love what you do, this is beautiful it is wonderful. I know that if this doesn’t work for me, I’ll change! I’ll do something else, I’ll go get a job and go somewhere else and do whatever else comes my way that feels better than quilting. But I don’t know, you got to do a lot of work, but my, my Being wants to be self-employed.

Kelly
[laughs]

Sabel
That’s just how I’ve always been. And I can work with people really well. But I don’t do menial things very well. I don’t do pointless things very well. So I don’t know, I don’t subscribe to that. I don’t subscribe to a lot of typical things, mainstream things like that, like if you’re hating it, that’s something deeper within yourself, you know? That’s where you gotta find the places like – the times that I’ve had a harder time it wasn’t the quilting and the job and the fact that I was doing it too much. It was that I was having a lot of fear and resistance to something else on a deeper personal level. So I’ve been doing a ton of work in the last year, like breaking through in the quilting business side of things. And also I’ve been doing a ton of work on the interpersonal side. And like I shed a couple of weird friendships that I had for a long time that were not working for me. And I shifted some of those friendships and some of them came back in and it worked out. And I’ve been doing a lot of interpersonal work on how I respond to my triggers, and I sit here and get triggered all day long while I’m working. I put my head in my hands and cried really hard two days ago when I made a little mistake. And – it’s just, you know, if it’s not one thing, it’s another. Wherever you go, there you are.

Kelly
Yeah!

Sabel
Whatever other job I’m doing. I’m gonna have good days and bad days and frustrating moments and beautiful moments and abundant moments and scarcity moments. And so I still choose this because I get to have color everywhere in my life. And I get to come and go as I please.

Kelly
For me, I would never have been able to afford all of my amazing vintage machines and the life I have now if I hadn’t professionalized. If I was trying to scrape scrape this money out of a nine to five I never could have done it. But probably my biggest thing that I’ve benefited from by becoming a professional is it has pushed my art. I wouldn’t have gained the competencies and skillsets that I have if I hadn’t professionalized because I would have never pushed myself. Do you have any thoughts about that?

Sabel
Yeah. Yeah absolutely. I feel the same way. Luckily, the, the quilting community on Instagram is very big and beautiful and helpful. A lot of quilters share a lot of a lot of tips and tricks and little things. I’ll catch something on someone’s feed. I’m like, “Oh, that’s how you do your binding!” “Oh, okay. You pin it like that!”. And I’ll go and I’ll do it. And I had been doing binding all these years, but now I’ve learned a few tricks from [Inrtagram] – “Ooh, that looks nice. I got it!” “Oh, I want to take a picture of that and put it on the internet.” Like, “Look everyone look how perfect I made that seam!” And so that’s definitely helped. Because now I’m like, alright, if I want to be high end, if I want to charge $8,000 for a quilt [then] I want it to be as close to perfect as I can get it. And not because I’m some weird perfectionist that’s like psycho and unhealthy. It’s because it’s like: I know how to make it beautiful and perfect. And I might as well.

Kelly
It’s been a real confidence booster for me to professionalize. And when you see someone – in my case, when someone has their most special event, and they’re wearing something I made, or when they put their profile pic up, and it’s something I made, or when they brag about it, or when they say, “Can you put your logo on this?” People are asking me to do that!

Sabel
Yeah –

Kelly
They can – you know, represent me. That’s a real confidence booster.

Sabel
Yeah.

Kelly
But – oh, go ahead. Go ahead.

Sabel
No you go ahead.

Kelly
I was just gonna say, I think for a lot of Creatives… when you’re a hobbyist, you get some compliments. And you’re worried that once you say, “Yeah, that’s great! Give me 200 bucks for it!” you’re worried you’re gonna lose something. Because of course, not everyone who complements is going to purchase. So what would you say to embolden someone who’s kind of thinking about that?

Sabel
Yeah. It goes back to kind of what we said a little while ago. If you price yourself too low, you won’t – it won’t be sustainable. You will drown in that swamp of Sad. The Sad Swamp. And then you won’t be available to do it at all! So it’s like, you’ve got to price it to somewhere that is nourishing. You don’t have to rip people off. But you’ve got to price it to a place where you go, yeah, the amount of time and materials that that will take me, I need this much money. And to do less just so you don’t lose a potential client? That’s a scarcity feeling. When I think about how I feel when I’m saying that, it’s like a little vibrating, like – oooh-ugh! in my chest. No, I don’t want to operate from that kind of place. I want to operate from: this is what I need to be able to do this. Otherwise, I will turn and put my energy somewhere else.

Kelly
Oh, gosh.

Sabel
Did that answer – ?

Kelly
And those clients, the times – that gal I met with, with without having vetted her. When I told her, “Okay, I can’t do what you’re asking for nine hundred – these are the rates you’d probably expect to pay -” she was pissed, and she was rude. And I never get treated with rudeness.

Sabel
That sucks. Yeah.

Kelly
And it’s like, yeah, she was rude. But that was on me because I let her sneak in on my schedule. So it’s like those clients that we try to please or that we undercut ourselves – sometimes they don’t treat us very well. And yeah, that’s pretty rough.

Sabel
Yeah. Yep. And the ones – now I do every single thing through an invoice through QuickBooks. I will pay all the merchant fees, I don’t care – just to make it so that they can click and pay with a credit card. And I can resend a reminder. Since legitimizing I don’t have any problems with folks that have asked me to do work and then not paid me. Because that’s happened a few times [in the past] when it was just like kind of a handshake kind of a thing. They were a friend and they saw me and they gave me a couple hundred bucks as a deposit right then and I was like ‘Great, I’ll work on your quilt, I’ll call you when it’s done!” And then I called him when it was done and – broke a rule: you don’t hand over the finished product until you’re getting paid –

Kelly
Right!

Sabel
I handed it [over] because it was kind of a complicated wall piece and I didn’t want to ship it and they had a friend right here in town that could drive it right then and I’m like “Great! Venmo me right now!” Venmo wasn’t working. So then I gave him the quilt. It took me a full month to get paid after that. And it was really frustrating. And I was like “Okay!” But I wasn’t mad at the person. It was like this is what happens. I know better than to break my own rules. All these little rules you set up and if I break it I will get burned! It’s how it goes?

Kelly
Yes. Oh my gosh, I love that story. Yeah, because people that are like, “Oh, I’m sorry, I’m late, my dog died or whatever” – they always think that they’re the only monkey wrench –

Sabel
Yeah!

Kelly
They always think that we’re not dealing with the fact that [for instance] our Meta is not vibing with our website. We’re dealing with so much. And so when people are flaky, it’s way more trouble than they might realize. To them, they’re like, “Can you wait two more months?” –

Sabel
Yeah.

Kelly
Oh, that means I have to go and change my notes and I have to write a new invoice. So the more we can streamline – that’s why I get on my soapbox about infrastructure. In general, it takes time to put infrastructure together and infrastructure will have little bugs, right? Like, suddenly QuickBooks does things differently. And you’ve got to figure it out. I love to hear that story that you get paid now!

Sabel
All these little tiny bits of infrastructure have allowed me to relax in a way that I didn’t know was possible, honestly. And as a Creative, what I want to be doing ninety-five percent of the time is just laying here and vibing with the Universe and being like “That color, that color, that shape!” And that’s all I want to do is just like let in the squirrels and the things and just be a little weirdo here in my room! And when I know that all I need to do is click a couple of buttons and send an invoice as soon as it’s done. And I already have all their information and their address, I didn’t have to – I didn’t have to message my client this morning and ask her for her address where I’m about to ship this because I got it six months ago when we did our consultation. I didn’t have to wait for a response at the post office and go “Where is she?” – you know, all these little tiny things that add up to where I want a smooth interface. And I want all of that to just be going like a well oiled machine on its own. And that’s what your course helped me do.

Kelly
I love that because now you have the mental – you have the time and the mental and emotional space to learn that new binding trick.

Sabel
Yes.

Kelly
Because you’re not chasing something down or like putting a post-it note somewhere or looking for the post-it note.

Sabel
Yeah, exactly. And so everywhere that I find a little crunchy place where I’ve made a mistake and I’m paying for it. Instead of getting mad at myself – or someone else or whatever – it’s just the moment of like, “Oh, okay, that’s where I need to come up with a little system.” And I pretty much always know the answer right away. I’m like, “Oh, that means I need to charge for that!” Or “I need to itemize for that” – or whatever it is. Okay, integrate it.

Kelly
Yeah. Love it. So before we before we close out and and I send people off to get on your newsletter. And I should have bought a king size quilt earlier last week I’m hearing now. So.

Sabel
Yeah. [laughs] You should’ve! Exactly.

Kelly
I want to ask you two questions. The first is, who do you think shouldn’t take my course? And who do you think should? If you’re trying to help people make a decision?

Sabel
It’s a hard question. Who do I think shouldn’t? All I’m thinking about are like animals. Frogs, okay. No frogs. Okay. Okay. I don’t know who shouldn’t I guess.

Sabel
Like last year, when Hudson was contemplating it, I think I just called him and left him a voicemail once – a long voice memo. And I was like, “Here’s what I got out of it.” For someone that already has like a pretty good handle on their craft, and has been starting to get some, you know – has been selling, has been doing a little bit [of business] and then we’re ready to fine-tune things. I feel like your course is really good for that.

Kelly
Yeah!

Sabel
I’m trying to think of if four years ago, if I would have been ready for it. When I came to your course, I’d already kind of done one business course once that was really markety – all about sales funnels. And that didn’t work for me. I’d already tried building a website, I’d already tried a newsletter. I’d already kind of barely dabbled and scratched the surface of some of that. And so I knew all those concepts existed, and I just wasn’t ready years ago. And now when I took your course, I was like, “Okay, I know about this. Now, let me just take the time and have the support to do those things better than I did a few years ago.” So if you’re kind of in that place, that’s what worked for me.

Kelly
I think that’s a really good sweet spot.

Sabel
Mm-hm.

Kelly
And I would just encourage people, like if you’re worried you’re not good enough at your craft? You can schedule a call with me!

Sabel
Yeah!

Kelly
So far I haven’t I haven’t found that person because by the time someone’s following me they’re all already someone who’s like wanting to make – they’re just Make, Make, Make!

Sabel
Yeah.

Kelly
And people that Make, Make, Make are always doing something really amazing. Even if it’s with you know, popsicle sticks and hot glue and beads, you’re just like –

Sabel
Yeah!

Kelly
“Damn, that shit is cool!” So –

Sabel
And you have enough information on your Instagram from all your Lives. If I’m ever bored and can’t find a podcast I just scroll down and put on one of your Lives from last year, two years ago and listen. Because there’s always something in there. And that’s the thing we will attract the right people that are for us. There are people – friends of mine that are like “You’re an amazing artist, I just don’t dig the really bright colors. I don’t want bright pink. That’s not my aesthetic!” And I have good friends that don’t want my art because they’re like, “You’re just not my style. But I love you know, no offense!” and I’m like, “Great, that’s fine!” you will find the artist that’s good for you. So there are people that will meet you and go “Yeah, this isn’t where I’m at. This isn’t my style, my aesthetic!” And there are people that will watch a few of your videos and go, “Ooh, I want this. I want more. I want more!” And so if you find yourself feeling that – “Oh wow, Kelly knows what they’re talking about!” then those people are for you!

Kelly
Yeah, I love that. Thank you. Yeah, I think that’s great. And, you know, I don’t want the wrong person in my class anyway.

Sabel
Yeah! Exactly.

Kelly
I’m pretty trustworthy about that, about vetting someone. So?

Sabel
Absolutely.

Kelly
So how do we get on your newsletter?

Sabel
Oh, you go to my website, sabelroseregalia.com, or sabelrose.com or gothclown.com. Or – I just buy domains. And I put them all into my website. But Sabel Rose Regalia my name, you can find it here through my Instagram, there’s a link to my website, and at the bottom of any page on my website you can join my newsletter, you can subscribe to my vibe. And I send the emails here and there that are generally pretty interesting and cute, I think. And -that’s how you do it. Follow me on Instagram.

Kelly
And that’s how we will know when you’ve got openings. You are a hot commodity.

Sabel
Yes. When I have openings for commissions – and then also in my website, you can access my shop that has lots of ready made items –

Kelly
I was just about to ask. Yeah, awesome.

Sabel
I’ve got a pretty big stack of things, a baby blankets, a couple of larger pieces that I made a few years ago that I have in the show – and bunting and pillows. I’m trying to make lots of pillows out of all my scraps at the end of projects as a way to like have less waste and just get those things out and going. Things that are a little more affordable for folks just to you know, seventy-five, a hundred dollar pillow. That seems to have a nice price range.

Kelly
Well, it’s been wonderful watching your Instagram. I love that your boyfriend holds up these really heavy quilts because I know – So helpful.

Sabel
He’s so helpful! I got a good assistant.

Kelly
Yeah, he must be kind of tall too.

Sabel
Yeah. If I’m gonna get a boyfriend he has to be –

Kelly
Yeah, no, I get it. Yeah, you take great photos. I just love that because I sort of envy you because you don’t need to find a human being to stick in your thing. Or like my friend who’s a metalsmith. I’m like, “Oh, you have something {this big} you have to take a picture of – that’s really nice.” Because I always gotta yeah, take a picture of a person.

Sabel
I have to plan time to go take photos of quilts. Like: “Alright, let’s do this. We’re gonna get out there!”

Kelly
And also those photos are your portfolio there. They speak for themselves. I’m okay. I’m not quite as good as your photos. My photos look okay, but it’s really easy to sell things when you have beautiful things. Yeah, people just start drooling. And –

Sabel
I think – your photos are great. I’m always impressed with your photos. Because you get in with the details of it. And you have a good style. You have a style. There’s a branding – like I’ll scroll real quickly. And I can always tell what’s a Kelly photo.

Kelly
Oh, that’s cool.

Sabel
Yeah!

Kelly
But I think you and I probably like the detail photos. But clients don’t [always]. They don’t dig the detail. They want to see a human – yeah a human being and –

Sabel
I see what you’re saying. I want to see I want to see the three perfect lines of stitches –

Kelly
That’s me!

Sabel
– the machine that you have – that’s what I want to see –

Kelly
Exactly. Those are for you and I. I don’t ever care about – like, I hardly ever model my stuff. But that’s what people want to see. So I tried to do a little bit.

Kelly
But Sabel, I want to thank you. Thank you. You’re a great student. You gave me a great referral in Hudson – he was so much fun. And I love to see how well you’re doing. And as far as that new market for the shop, I’ll be thinking about that and if I find someone that can help with that –

Sabel
Yeah, thank you!

Kelly
Because you and I both know that that market is out there. Uh, but it just takes so much time. So if there’s someone out there that can help, that would be really cool. Yeah, that’d be great. So -great.

Sabel
Great! Well thanks for having me on, it was so nice to see you.

Sabel
And yeah, good luck. Everybody if you feel it take Kelly’s course. Yeah, absolutely. The WHOLE ENCHILADA!

Kelly
Yeah. All right. Thank you so much Sabel!

Sabel
You too. Bye!

***

Interested in hearing more about my WHOLE ENCHILADA course? I send out emails on Mondays, gearing up for the spring and summer sessions. You can sign up for those here.