Testimonial: Hudson Soules of Soules Landscapes

Last Friday I met with the amazing Hudson of Soules Landscapes! He credits the WHOLE ENCHILADA with transforming his business practices – and getting him back out in the earth, moving stones and plants! Give us a listen – and go ahead and hit the CC for the captions, as the Instagram video quality is a bit off!

Play Video about Hudson Soules of Soules Landscaping, praising the WHOLE ENCHILADA

Kelly
Hey, Instagram, it’s Kelly Hogaboom with Bespoke Hogaboom, and I am live today to talk with a friend and a former student of my business course – and an amazing landscape artist, which is incredible. I know you’re going to absolutely love my friend Hudson from Soules Landscapes. He is an amazing person. I’m just absolutely delighted to have got to know him this last year. I’m going to invite him on. And I’m hoping to give lots of encouragement to other ethical creatives. And – landscaping, right? Hudson! Hello! 

Hudson
Hi, Kelly. 

Kelly
Oh – my AirPods aren’t working. 

Hudson
Microphone check! 

Kelly
Yeah, right? I’ll just leave ’em in. So first of all, I’m repping your brand today. “Soules Landscapes” – thank you for the swag! How are you this afternoon? 

Hudson
Doing well! good to see you. 

Kelly
It’s good to see you. You’ve been kind of keeping me in the loop. You send me an email about every two months, it sounds like things are going incredible for you. So just just because you’re not on Instagram a lot, you’re busy working as – I think I knew that was the type of guy you were for, like three minutes into meeting you. Do you want to introduce yourself and tell people who you are, where you are, and what you do?

Hudson
Sure. Hey y’all my name’s Hudson Soules, and I’m in Atlanta, Georgia. I lived in the Bay Area for 17 years and just kind of stumbled honestly into the landscaping field after graduating college, and I haven’t looked back since. It’s been a great fit and I’ve had incredible mentors along the way and coworkers. Samantha is watching right now and she’s a phenomenal human being and we work together and she took over the business in Berkeley and Oakland. So what’s up, Sam? And yeah, I’m just in Atlanta. I moved back right before the pandemic and worked with and for my dear lifelong friend Jessie, who had an established landscape business. We had a good run and I was able to develop my own business while working with him. And it’s been about a year and a half that I’ve been really focused on Soules Landscapes. And really, the blast off point was about when I started taking your class last. When was that? When did that start – July or something? 

Kelly
I can’t even remember. I can’t remember. You were June or a September –

Hudson
It ended at Thanksgiving. So it was three months, right? 

Kelly
September then. 

Hudson
Yeah, yeah. So Sabel Rose – shout out to Sabel Rose because she told me how incredible you are and that she really benefited from your class. So that was the plug, as I say for me. And yeah, I just learned so much from you, Kelly, and I’m happy to talk about anything you want. 

Kelly
Well, first I wanted to ask you questions about your business because like – the minute I met you, I was already – I wouldn’t say, intimidated. But as I said, as I joked about several times during the course, I can’t do anything in my yard. My yard is fine because we have a guy once a year and then my partner, my husband keeps on top of it the rest of the year. But I’m already really impressed by someone who has the skillset you have. So I guess I wanted to talk a bit about your actual work before we talk about the course, because what I’m wanting people that are watching not only to get to know you, but to kind of understand how how ethics come into play to landscaping, and how artistry comes into play to landscape work. Because when we met, you already had a strong ethical foundation, an environmental foundation, and of course, you’re quite the artist. So tell us about landscaping and there are these opportunities to do it a little different in both those regards. 

Hudson
Absolutely. Well, you know, I think… there’s like the traditional landscaping path that involves a lot of chemicals and not really taking into mind so much the whole ecosystem of a yard or a garden of one’s property and how that relates to the gardens and yards and properties around. So, you know, one kind of major but simple thing is I don’t use pesticides and herbicides. And you know, it sounds simple, but if everyone did that, honestly, there’d be a lot less cancer in there in the world. There might be a few more weeds, too. 

Kelly
Yeah, right? 

Hudson
You know, but then we’d get more creative with with things like rolling out cardboard, which Samantha and I learned from our mentor Jim to smother the weeds and he put planting mates and mulch on top and you start anew. So there’s no like, there’s no magical solutions. But I think  every bit helps when you take into account that all parts of the environment are connected. And that goes for ten by ten area – and the whole world. 

Kelly
Beautifully said! And I do have a next door neighbor and I’m always looking out the window and they always have their chemicals that they’re squirting in their yard. And I got to be honest, their yard looks a little better than mine, but I don’t think it looks a lot better than mine. And I always think of all the plastic that the chemicals go into – do you know what I mean? So when you talk about newspaper or cardboard, weed blocking, which actually I do have some experience doing, it just seems like such a simple, inexpensive – I mean, obviously at scale, everything cost some money but for someone like me – inexpensive, there’s no plastic, there’s no chemicals. And I guess I hadn’t thought before I met you that the landscaper on your scale and your level could employ the same eco-friendly techniques. So I think that’s just so cool. 

Hudson
Thanks, Kelly. And you know, I got to give a lot of credit to Jim, my great mentor who taught Samantha and I his technique. And, you know, the Bay Area I was fortunate to learn a lot there because they’re a little ahead of the curve and a lot of places like Atlanta, like, for example. Suppliers [in the Bay Area], you could buy large rolls of cardboard specifically for this method. Here [in Atlanta], that doesn’t happen. So, you know, I order from U-Line, a big shipping company, and they deliver big cardboard rolls. But I’m honestly kind of grateful for that because it’s never been a better time and place here to kind of have the aesthetics and the approach of the Bay Area in Atlanta. People are open and receptive to it. A lot of people have literally moved from the Bay Area and from New York City, and they’re like, What do I do with this yard? So it’s it’s an exciting time to be in the trade. And also, you know, the pandemic’s has been good to landscaping, you know, for for better or for worse. It’s it’s sucked all around for everybody, but it’s been good for the for the trade. 

Kelly
Yeah, I remember you mentioning that in the course and we were talking about how, yeah, you’re at home more. You look out your window and you’re not inspired by what you see outside. And some of us that have worked from home, we’ve saved money on gas and car upkeep – like we kind of have some resources to invest in our homes or our yards. 

Kelly
So do you do mostly residential or commercial or do you do parks – where’s your wheelhouse these days 

Hudson
It’s solely residential. I’ve done one commercial project, a collaborative project in the neighborhood here where we turned an empty weedy lot next to a community store that also serves burgers. It’s like the beloved – the heartbeat of the neighborhood – and basically investors bought the lot, but is leasing it to the store to become their outdoor eating zone. So we, you know, didn’t do anything too crazy, but we made it a nice place to eat outside, turned a weedy trashy lot into slate chips, picnic tables, and added a few funky touches as well. 

Kelly
So that, I guess leads me to that second piece – talk about the artistry of landscape work. One thing that we talked about a lot in the course is when you do any kind of custom art project of any sort, there’s this power differential between the client and the artist, right? And it’s like, who is making the decisions, who’s coming and walking around and saying, I want different colored whatever. Can you speak to that? Because I think for an artisan or a creative it can be really hard to come boldly into that space and take artistic control. So how does that play out for landscaping? 

Hudson
That’s a really good question. Honestly, it is a dance because you got to take in the information the clients are sharing, you know, and you also kind to look at the whole picture and know that I’ve been in thousands of gardens and spent thousands of hours in gardens and have a sense of what we’ll look good with what and to be able to share that with the clients. Often we’re on the same page. And if not, it doesn’t take a lot of convincing or if they’re like, No, I really want this color mulch or whatever, it’s like, OK, I don’t usually use dyed mulch, but I see where you’re coming from. We’ll go with it. You know? 

Kelly
It’s funny you would say often we’re on the same page. I want to just point out to anyone watching now or later: the fact that Hudson is often “on the same page” means he’s doing a great job with his marketing, so he’s getting the right people to talk to him in the first place. And I think that that is key for a Creative artpreneurship. By the time someone serious about you, they already kind of fit your values, your vibe. Can you speak to that? Have you ever met with someone that was not a good fit? And what came of that? 

Hudson
Honestly, I met with quite a few people who weren’t a good fit before your class and since your class, since I got the website up – you know, even when they’re not a good fit, we have a positive exchange. They receive some, some good ideas from me and then they’re like, Oh, you know, you’re out of my price range and I’m like, OK, did you not look at the pricing on the website? Okay, like, maybe I should put a little more explicitly like, look at the pricing and basically pricing and aesthetics are like the two things. But, you know, I think you helped me realize in the class, you basically want to create a door for clients to choose to walk through. And then once they’re through the door, have very clear signs that say, OK, are we a good fit to take the next step? And you just make that path clear. And it benefits myself and them, and no one’s wasted time or energy. 

Hudson
And you know, I think a big one that you help me with and and the book you recommended as well as welll – the Win Without Pitching Manifesto, gotta shout out that book it’s awesome as well. But basically, you know, we’re not gonna give advice or knowledge or expertize without getting paid. So, you know, now I have way less consultations, but I get paid a hundred dollars per consultation. And if we work together, then that gets subtracted from the total project cost. And if we don’t, it’s like, Hey, you know, I feel good about sharing information. 

Kelly
So you know, I’m obsessed with that book – and I’m really glad you read it – and the last proclamation, there was a point where the author said, “You need the respect first before the money.” And I’m like, that sentence rattles – and I’m paraphrasing – but that concept rattles around in my brain, like it lives here rent-free because all of us know what it’s like to get approached without respect. And all of us know what it’s like – or not all of us, but the people who take my course, they leave and they get respect because they have a different way of doing things. And it’s a night and day difference. 

Kelly
You know I think you Hudson, you already were on a really healthy path, in part because you just love what you do. You’re a great person and you have great mentors. But I’m guessing that at this point, you’re having an even more – like you say, you’re not wasting time on people that aren’t the right people. 

Hudson
That’s right. And you know that Kelly, as you know, compounds on itself so you know, the projects that are getting approved are these win-win fits, and they have the budget that allows the creativity, allows me to go the extra mile. And do you know, the more beautiful things that pop? So that’s the successes – I really can see them just building on each other in a positive way. 

Kelly
It sounds like, I mean, that’s the sweet spot where you’re starting to get paid to play! You know, that’s what every artist –  right? Whether whether you’re selling fifty cent stickers or fifty thousand dollar installations, like what you’re doing – when you’re in that spot, where you have that trust and that respect and you’re getting those clients and you’re getting to play, you’re getting to buy new materials or new equipment. Right? And it’s like, I don’t know about you, but you know, fifteen years ago, I couldn’t afford the equipment and supplies – I *longed* for them. I envied people that had them. And professionalizing as a Creative means you get paid to be able to deepen your artistry, which is really exciting. 

Hudson
It is. It is. And you know even that inspiration of the creative aspect of the work, you know, fuels me to keep going and makes me pumped! And having all the business stuff that I – that I wasn’t the best at frankly, before the class – I’m not the best that now, but I’m way better, way better. And having that be a smooth door for folks to walk through while I’m over here working, it’s all laid out. And I get an emails: okay, another consultation. And here’s the number, here’s the address, here’s the time which already I know works for me because of Calendly. And you know – 

Kelly
I feel like, like four minutes after meeting you, I was like, okay I’m going to have to get Hudson to come inside for five minutes to set up – like, because like, you just like to work, you just like to be out there. But – so what you’re talking about is infrastructure, the infrastructure that creates a smooth flow of clients. So what have you adopted that you got as a result of the course? What are the new things you do now that make your life easier? 

Hudson
Literally like I was speaking to: paid consultations. That was a that was a big leap with my heart and cut, and I was a little nervous. I was like, Oh, what if no no one makes appointments? And – so that was a little leap of faith. But then, sure enough, appointments started to be made. [I also] invested a chunk – not an insane amount – but a chunk into a real nice website. And that is a *total* game changer. And working with really awesome people on that who were able to say, You know I think professional photographs would really help the website and here’s a photographer we like. And then that photographer was awesome and made things easy. And, you know, just kind of following rabbit hole per se, but a really good rabbit hole. 

Hudson
And so the paid consultation was huge with Calendly, which I learned from you, it sets up the consultations and it’s – it’s actually all this stuff that I did working together because you got to have – to get you paid, connected to bank account, you got Calendly to set up the thing and you gotta have your website, the host, all this stuff – which honestly, I barely understand, but I paid for people who do understand it to set it up well for me. But that is kind of what the before and after the WHOLE ENCHILADA was. I know how to make beautiful landscapes, I love making beautiful landscapes. I’m doing all right and not doing bad here … but then I gotta like text back and forth, you know, five or ten times with a client set up a meeting or to explain why it’s worth it, you know, and now it’s like, boom! the portfolio tells you it’s worth it – or it doesn’t. And it tells you approximately how much it’s going to cost. And [the site] tells you my philosophy is and approach to a degree. And so I, you know, just a whole lot more clarity that I’m able to bring. And also just want to share like it’s exciting too, because as dialed in it all is now – I still feel like I’m just beginning. 

Kelly
Yeah. And you were also, I think you were doing some work on quotes too when we first met. And you don’t work very hard on those anymore, right? 

Hudson
Well, you know, honestly, I put those together, you know, but it’s kind of a different energy. I’m either more sure they’re going to go for it or I’m okay spending the time because again, I’ve received some income from meeting with them. And also just putting numbers out there where I’m like, Hey, like, we’re worth it: we bring something that nobody else can bring. And I know that number is going to give us the breathing room for me to pay my team well and to have that creative like – we’re going to knock it out of the park every time. 

Kelly
And you had an asset when we met, which was your Next Door reputation. So you had a sort of testimonial-referral system happening with Next Door. Some people it’ll be Facebook or LinkedIn or whatever, but I absolutely love that you invested in the website because if anything, ever changes with Next Door or if they do something goofy or they get bought by a company that you just can’t stomach or they start doing kind of like shady stuff like what Yelp does? I don’t know if you know Yelp – 

Hudson
I know them. I don’t know what they do. 

Kelly
Oh, well, I don’t know if they’re still doing this. But for a long time, if you didn’t pay to have a Yelp account, they would push the negative reviews to the top. So – just like shady, right? So you know, investing in your own platform is really smart because Next Door was working pretty well for you when we met and now you still have Next Door. You or your website crew did a great job capturing [those] testimonials. So well done on that, and I agree with our friend Sabel. Your website is beautiful and you did invest in that. 

Kelly
And you know, that’s one reason I started a mentor contract for people that can’t do websites, I’ll do their website as well because I have some skills. Websites are tricky. You either pay for ’em or you gotta build ’em, right? So, yeah.

Kelly
So what would you, I guess, before we talk a tiny bit more about the course – what are you setting their sights on? Like, what do you want to happen next? I mean, you’re busy. You’re working a lot. Sometimes it’d be hard to plan what’s next because you’re working. But do you have a vision for your future? 

Hudson
You know, that’s a good question. I feel like I am in a little growth spurt. But right now, I just connected with this awesome dude who is seemingly a perfect fit to be an employee more so than a contractor. Young guy with experience: strong, enthusiastic, he has a part time flexible serving job, waiter job. So, you know, I have four projects scheduled right now and a few more irons in the fire, and three more consultations. But right now I’m really just focused on doing an amazing job on each project that comes while getting more projects and kind of seeing how it naturally builds. Just organically connecting with this young guy, seemingly perfect fit. I’m not thinking ahead yet to like, Oh, I have a crew here and a crew there. I’m just trying to really nurture what’s going on because I really am loving it and kind of honestly pinching myself because I love who I work with. You know, we’re able to do some amazing stuff and not that much. And you know, it’s a great feeling!

Kelly
That’s kind of how I got into teaching because I love to make like a hoodie or a coverall or a satin jacket. But what I really love is to work with the Creative and help them build a better business. It’s such a creative process because instead of the raw material being like satin and cotton, and the raw material is Hudson, where it’s like, Oh yeah, he has all these assets. He has these – not weaknesses per se, but things that he hasn’t necessarily looked into or he’s intimidated by –

Hudson
Oh, I’d say I have some weaknesses! [laugh]

Kelly
[laugh] Well, most creatives are just – they just are dying to create. That’s all. It’s not that they can’t figure out tech, it’s that they don’t really want to! They want to be out there – they want to be in their studio painting or they want to be moving stones and plants or whatever. So it’s like, how do we do the least amount of work to get the most rugged infrastructure? And how do we get them the right clients? Because once you start having the right clients, your life changes, and that’s something a lot of new entrepreneurs don’t understand. They’re still still fiddle-f*cking around with the wrong people, people that don’t respect [them]. People that are happy to waste their time, stuff like that. You were well ahead of the curve on that when we met, I have to say You had a really great set up coming in. So another thing I like to talk about the course is the peer aspect. So we had I can’t remember if there were seven of us or eight or nine – I honestly cannot remember. 

Hudson
Yeah. Right around there – eight maybe?

Kelly
So you got to know some of these people. How would you describe your fellow students? Did you feel like they were invested in you? Did you feel like they cared? Did you feel like they kind of popped in, popped out? How would you describe that experience? 

Hudson
You know, I would describe it as a very cohesive experience. I met a lot of wonderful people through the class and the study buddy sessions in between the classes – because as you shared, in the classes were not going to be really hanging out and, you know, getting to know each other so much were going to be learning the business aspects. So the hour meet-ups in between classes with a different student each week was very helpful just to create more cohesion as well as inspire and hold each other accountable. And also just keep the energy of the class going throughout the week. 

Hudson
So between the study buddy sessions and the homework, the class was always happening, which was a great thing. And you know, I appreciated the diversity of where people’s businesses were coming from, and I felt a little bit like an outlier and very welcomed and included. That was an awesome feeling because most folks worked with fabrics and yeah, and textiles or something related to that. 

Kelly
Yeah, you know, it occurred to me like, I think I could make money faster if I was to hyper niche and to [serve only] custom clothing and fashion. But I don’t have an interest in niching that far down because I had a wonderful time with you and I learned a lot about your business. And because because at the end of the day, I’m more of the ethics-based person. I’m not trying to create a bunch of businesses. I’m trying to change our planet. I’m trying to change the human beings and how they interact with materials and how they interact with other people. So I don’t -it’s not like I’m in this to to churn through a bunch of fiber artists. I’m really excited when I get someone that’s doing something really off [fiber arts]. And I I did feel like you got enough good support. Even though a lot of people there – no one there was like a landscape artist per se. 

Kelly
And I guess like the other, the other thing I was thinking is when it comes to like being an ethical landscaper, when it comes to doing things that are a little bit harder, trickier. Do you feel like – you definitely have the client support – [but] do you ever feel like an outlier in your industry? Or do you feel like there’s enough of this discussion in the industry writ large that you don’t feel uncomfortable? 

Hudson
You know, it kind of ties back to in the Bay Area I’m kind of the norm, and I’m a little ahead of the curve. But but no one’s looking at me like this guy is crazy, this guy doens’t know what he’s talking about. They’re like, Oh, this guy’s like a little different. Thinking about the environment. And so – does that answer your question? 

Kelly
Yeah. Yeah, it’s just I know that sometimes when you’re ahead of the curve, you can feel lonely, but it sounds like that’s not been your experience. 

Hudson
I tell you, it’s kind of like – Kelly, it really feels like if you’re a surfer, it’s like, I’m just right, right at that big moment? Where it’s like, OK, let’s surf this wave -. 

Kelly
Nice! 

Hudson
You know, because I’m not just paddling out there like all, when’s it comin’? When’s it comin’? Or like, Oh my god, this waves fifty feet and I’m gonna die if I don’t surf it, it’s just like, you know, a nice little fifteen-footer like – let’s go! 

Kelly
You’re definitely “right place, right time” Hudson – and in a lot of ways I feel like you have a blessed life. But but you’re also a very hard worker and you’ve created this thing despite having the mentors – you *have* created it, you’re sustaining it. And are you saying that this will be your first employee – you’ve been working with contractors up until now? 

Hudson I have, yes. 

Kelly
That’s a huge – that’s a wonderful next step, because you’re going to have to figure out taxes like – it’s going to be a little bit annoying. You’ll definitely get it figured out and then you’ll be providing that kind of support to another human being, which is something I haven’t done yet. And it seems like an incredibly wonderful thing to do for somebody. 

Hudson
I’m excited, you know, I’ve only worked one day with him, it was kind of a mellow, clean up, most day of a garden we created and installed last year. So it’s nice, low stakes, just me and him and Tyler. And you know, I was asking like, You know what? What are your long term goals and stuff? He’s like Well I’m looking to be a part of a company I can grow with – and I loved his work and he’s looking to become financially stable. So, you know, I’m excited about the possibility of being a mentor, you know, similar. Because those relationships can be invaluable. There’s nothing that can replace what I learned from Jim. 

Kelly
That’s so funny because my very first boss when I was thirteen, that was a big part of her mandate was to groom an employee. I was thirteen years old and she had to get a special permit to get me to work. And I think about her a lot because she taught me what it meant to be a good employee and what the customer needed to see – and all of those things. And so she went beyond being a boss and she was a mentor. And I don’t know that I’d be sitting here today doing the work I do if I hadn’t had that early experience. I’ve had good, had good bosses and I’ve had some really bad ones. But Hudson, you know you you benefited from mentorship a couple of times in your life, and yeah you’re providing it now – even to your contractors, of course, but certainly if you take an employee on. So that’s awesome. 

I have one more question to ask. OK. Yes, I did set up the course to be – it’s a fair amount of homework and it’s, I don’t know what, four hours of time a week in lecture and study buddy but I set it up to where someone working full time could do the work. Do you feel like it was at that level or was it a little too sparse? Was a little too much? 

Hudson
I think, you know, I’m not just saying this to flatter you. I think it was right on the money. Where it was just like – if folks are watching this considering the course, it’s like. Yeah. Take it if you’re all in, you know, and I encourage you to be all in because I guarantee you your future self will thank you tremendously. But you know, it was inspiring to me because it kind of lit a fire under my butt where on [class day] Saturday it wasn’t like, Oh, I’m going to go in a chill mode with like my one chill day, kick back. It’s like, Oh, I’m gonna get ready for class. And so it was very motivational in that way. And just I was able to just ride that wave, you know, just build energy through the class of focusing on the business end and then integrating what we were learning in class, real time and in real time. Seeing the results being like, OK, this is working – you know, and it was an amazing experience. But yeah, like I’d say, you know, anyone like can’t fully show up like, it’s not going to be a great experience. 

Kelly
I totally agree with you there. I just wrote a blog post two days ago talking about business courses in general. I said, Hey, I hope you take mine, but I got real limited seating and I want you to take a business course, right? I’ve taken a few and I agree with you if you’re not all in, if you’re not going to do the homework, there’s nowhere you can park your ass for a few hours a week and you and your business gets built. You’ve got to start implementing some changes. And you know, my job probably in the next eight weeks, is going to be helping people decide if they’re all in or not. 

Kelly
But, you know, I think a lot of people let’s just – let’s just wind this up trying to give some encouragement to people, whether they’re going to take a course for me or not. A lot of people don’t yet have your confidence or my confidence because they haven’t started yet or they’ve puttered around or they’re half-assed and they deep, deep down worry that they don’t have what it takes. So do you want to say any words of either warning or encouragement on that topic? 

Hudson I would like to vote for encouragement, because you know, what life has shown me is like every time I make that leap of faith or that step that I’m intimidated about, which there’s been many along the way and I’m fifteen years deep into this trade. But every time you know, life and the Universe is like, “Good job, here you go!”. And so I would just say a lot of encouragement and to just cultivate a mindset and a perspective where there is no failure, because guess what? We learn the most from falling down and we get stronger and more resilient by getting back on and saying, OK, what did I learn from that? I really hurt my butt that time! But yeah, 

Kelly
Yeah, I guess I would say to any Creative out there, you’re already good at your work. Like, do you notice on the course you didn’t really talk about improving your technical skills – it’s like, Nah, man, he’s good at that part. The part we got, we might want to learn as the business aspect. And I guess I would say in relative order, it is like respecting yourself and putting your artistry first, putting your ethics first – two first! – then building terms that work for you, including your pricing, which we do a lot of math on the pricing, right? 

Hudson
Mm-hmm!

Kelly
And then you got to think about customer care and you’ve got to think about that customer, what he is coming to the party with what he’s worried about and a lot of reassurance to those customers.  You know, one of the things that the book we talked about, [the author] talks about regret being an inevitable part of the sales cycle. So in other words, when Hudson comes over and we make a decision and I’m going to give them this big chunk of change to to do my yard, even if I one hundred percent love his work, I’m so excited, I know he’s great… But there’s this part of me that now is like, Oh gosh, that’s a big, big chunk of money. And so one thing Hudson does that I do is reassure that person, reassure them that they made the right choice. And that takes a lot of assertiveness to say: “Thank you. Thank you for your business. Let’s get this going!” So I guess I would just say to anyone out there who’s considering getting more serious about their entrepreneurship is to be careful which business mentors you talk to –

Hudson
Right! 

Kelly
Because some of them will not respect your creative energy and they might not respect your ethics. I’ve done many webinars that it’s all about making money, and it’s like, here’s how you can make money using Amazon drop shipping. I don’t want to do that – right? – and I don’t want to stay here for another hour listening to that. So anyone out there – make sure to find someone who matches your values and your ethics and who respects your creative process!

Hudson
Absolutely, Kelly. And yeah, that’s why I was thrilled to learn from you because you put ethics and human relationships [first] as well as artistry. You know, before profits. And, you know, I feel like hopefully the world we’re creating together and moving into and we see, you know, proof’s in the pudding. You put those first, the profits are there, you know? Yeah, they’re going to be there because there’s enough people that who see that you care for the right – you know, you care for the Earth, you care for your teammates, you care for them as clients – and that that’s worth an extra – whatever. 

Kelly
Yeah! I’m only sad that unless I mov to Atlanta, I’ll never get your actual work on my yard, but – 

Hudson
Oh never say never, you know? 

Kelly
Now, yeah, if you like you ever do a little nomadic [work], we would love to have you. 

Hudson
That’d be awesome, Kelly! 

Kelly
Hudson like I said, you were already off to an amazing start when we met. I’m glad the course was worth it for you. I’m glad it changed your life in ways that let you get back out there and get get back into the earth, because that is definitely where you belong and I want to congratulate you. You’ve done really well and you’re very confident and you’re treating your team great. And thank you for sending me emails now and then because I actually love to see what you’re up to. Your website looks great. So yeah, thank you so much for joining me. 

Hudson
Thank you for having me, Kelly. It’s an honor to join you, and I can’t really put into words how much I learned from you, and I hope that your next cohort is the perfect cohort for that time and place. And, you know, I hope they get even more out of the class than I do. 

Kelly
So, yeah, I hope it fills up. I’d love to keep doing it. So we’ll see. Thank you so much, Hudson. And I’ll be seeing you in my inbox, hopefully. 

Hudson
Sounds good. All right. All right. Bye! 

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Interested in hearing more about my WHOLE ENCHILADA course? I send out emails on Mondays, gearing up for the spring and summer sessions. You can sign up for those here.